Official alcohol guidelines”Plucked out of the air”

Official alcohol guidelines that were”plucked out of the air” wrongly suggest we can drink almost daily with no ill effects doctors have said.

They have been set too high and fail to take into account evidence that shows drinking only modest amounts raise the risk of cancer and other diseases, they say.

The issue is investigated in a three-part documentary into British government guidelines on alcohol, diet and exercise starting today on BBC Radio 4.

The current guidelines recommend that men should limit themselves to “three to four units” a day, which the NHS likens to “not much more than a pint of strong lager” and women not to drink more than”two to three units “a day, equivalent to”no more than a standard 175ml glass of wine”.

Research published last year suggests consumption should be much lower perhaps only a quarter of a pint of beer daily.

Dr. Michael Mosley’s research for the documentary found the guidelines were based on limited data on the harmful effects of low to moderate level drinking. They were formulated in 1987 by a Royal College of Physicians working party.

In 2007, Richard Smith, one of the members of the group and a former editor of the ‘British Medical Journal’ said it could not say what a safe limit was because of this lack of data.

“These limits were really plucked out of the air”, he said.  “They were not based on any real evidence at all”

The British government had “presented these guidelines as if they were about health, but they are not”. “They are more about behaviour, trying to stop you going out and crashing the car or fighting” he said.

A Harvard University study published in the “Journal of the American Medical Association in 2011, found that women who drank only four small glasses of wine a week – about five units-increased their risk of developing breast cancer by 15% compared with non-drinkers.

Another 2011 study estimated that alcohol caused 13,000 cancers a year, including 6,000 of the mouth and throat, 3,000 bowel cancer cases and 2,500 cases of breast cancer.

Last May, scientists published research recommending that people should cut consumption to 50ml of wine a day, or quarter of a pint of beer.

Daily Telegraph, London.

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“For your long-term health, it’s better to be an intermittent non-binge-drinker than a regular drinker.”

How alcohol affects inflammation.

According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, moderate alcohol consumption is up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men. However, even this is too high when we look at the research. And many people are drinking more than that.

Size matters too. A serving size is a 12-ounce beer, 5-ounce glass of wine, or a 1.5-ounce shot of liquor. Some people generously fill their wineglass (16 to 18 ounces) and consider it one glass.

Some research shows that light to moderate alcohol consumption can have anti-inflammatory benefits. However, large amounts of alcohol can create intestinal inflammation through multiple pathways.

A vicious cycle ensues as the inflammatory response exacerbates alcohol-induced organ damage, affecting your gut but also other organs, like the liver.

How your body responds to alcohol depends on several factors. Enjoying a glass of organic red wine will have a completely different impact than drinking a margarita or other sugary alcohol concoctions (a surefire way to rev up inflammation, by the way, based on everything I noted in the above section about sugar).

Some people also enjoy a glass of dry red wine as their dessert. For others, a glass becomes two, and before they know it, they’re devouring a second piece of pie. In other words, know how alcohol makes you behave, as it disinhibits your brain control centers and will lead you to overindulge in the other contributors to inflammation.

Like caffeine, alcohol can be dehydrating. Be especially mindful to drink sufficient water when you’re drinking. Certain situations like drinking while flying can be even more dehydrating, potentially exacerbating inflammation.

So, how much alcohol can you get away with without causing too much inflammation? Stick to one drink three times a week or less to enjoy your cup while keeping the tides of inflammation low. And for your long-term health, it’s better to be an intermittent non-binge-drinker than a regular drinker.

Let’s face it—a warm brew, a glass of red wine, and an occasional pastry are all life’s little pleasures. Consumed mindfully and in a low-stress environment, they will minimally affect inflammation and can even be anti-inflammatory. Treating these as luxuries to enjoy in moderation allows you to indulge, while managing inflammation and keeping your cells young.

https://www.mindbodygreen.com/articles/how-caffeine-sugar-and-alcohol-affect-inflammation

How alcohol affects inflammation.

How alcohol affects inflammation.

According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, moderate alcohol consumption is up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men. However, even this is too high when we look at the research. And many people are drinking more than that.

Size matters too. A serving size is a 12-ounce beer, 5-ounce glass of wine, or a 1.5-ounce shot of liquor. Some people generously fill their wineglass (16 to 18 ounces) and consider it one glass.

Some research shows that light to moderate alcohol consumption can have anti-inflammatory benefits. However, large amounts of alcohol can create intestinal inflammation through multiple pathways.

A vicious cycle ensues as the inflammatory response exacerbates alcohol-induced organ damage, affecting your gut but also other organs, like the liver.

How your body responds to alcohol depends on several factors. Enjoying a glass of organic red wine will have a completely different impact than drinking a margarita or other sugary alcohol concoctions (a surefire way to rev up inflammation, by the way, based on everything I noted in the above section about sugar).

Some people also enjoy a glass of dry red wine as their dessert. For others, a glass becomes two, and before they know it, they’re devouring a second piece of pie. In other words, know how alcohol makes you behave, as it disinhibits your brain control centers and will lead you to overindulge in the other contributors to inflammation.

Like caffeine, alcohol can be dehydrating. Be especially mindful to drink sufficient water when you’re drinking. Certain situations like drinking while flying can be even more dehydrating, potentially exacerbating inflammation.

So, how much alcohol can you get away with without causing too much inflammation? Stick to one drink three times a week or less to enjoy your cup while keeping the tides of inflammation low. And for your long-term health, it’s better to be an intermittent non-binge-drinker than a regular drinker.

Let’s face it—a warm brew, a glass of red wine, and an occasional pastry are all life’s little pleasures. Consumed mindfully and in a low-stress environment, they will minimally affect inflammation and can even be anti-inflammatory. Treating these as luxuries to enjoy in moderation allows you to indulge, while managing inflammation and keeping your cells young.

https://www.mindbodygreen.com/articles/how-caffeine-sugar-and-alcohol-affect-inflammation