Recipe: Blueberry-Walnut Pancakes

Grain-free, sugar-free and dairy-free

Do you miss seeing a stack of pancakes on the brunch table? Now you don’t have to. These grain-free, sugar-free, dairy-free pancakes are the perfect guilt-free treat. They’re easy to make, and the whole family will love them. Yum!

Ingredients

3 large omega-3 eggs
¾ cup almond milk
½ tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
½ cup coconut flour
½ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda
Pinch of sea salt
¼ cup roughly chopped walnuts
coconut oil, for greasing the skillet (about ¼ cup)
1 pint fresh blueberries
½ cup arrowroot
1 teaspoon cinnamon

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs and then add the almond milk, lemon juice, and vanilla. Whisk until well-blended. In a separate bowl, mix together the coconut flour, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, salt and arrowroot. Add the dry ingredients to the wet mixture, ¼ cup at a time, while continuously whisking. Once combined, gently fold in the walnuts.
  2. Grease a large skillet and place over medium heat. Once the skillet is hot, use a ladle to pour 3-inch pancakes onto the skillet. Cook until bubbles appear, then flip. The pancake should cook on each side for about 2-3 minutes. Repeat with rest of the batter. Add a tablespoon or more of coconut oil to the hot griddle, as needed.
  3. Make a blueberry sauce by simmering the blueberries in a small saucepan with 2 tablespoons of water for 10 minutes before serving.
  4. To serve, place 3 pancakes on a plate and top each stack with the blueberry sauce.

Nutritional information (per serving)

Makes 2-3 servings.

Calories 423
Total Fat 19 g
Protein 12 g
Fiber 14 g
Sugar 14 g
Sodium 416 mg

— Recipe courtesy of Mark Hyman, MD 

Recipe: Ginger Spice Smoothie@ClevelandClinic.#healthaware

This creamy, low-carb smoothie is a great way to start your day on the right, energetic foot!

Recipe: Ginger Spice Smoothie

This creamy, low-carb smoothie is a great way to start your day on the right, energetic foot. An additional benefit is that ginger is great for digestion!

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups almond or cashew milk
2 tablespoons raw almond butter
2 teaspoons grated ginger
1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
1 handful baby spinach or greens of choice

Directions

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth and creamy.
  2. Serve immediately.

Nutrition information (per serving)

Makes 1 serving

Calories: 400
Total fat: 31 g
Saturated fat: 4 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Fiber: 7 g
Protein: 13 g
Carbohydrate: 19 g
Sodium: 30 mg

—Recipe courtesy of Mark Hyman, MD

This fresh English Pea Pasta recipe is loaded with healthful pea protein @ClevelandClinic

There is something special about using fresh peas straight out of the pod. This recipe was inspired by our root-to-stem philosophy of cooking: It always seems like such a waste to throw away the pea pods, but they are relatively inedible. To make use of the pods, we’ve pureed them into a spring-fresh pasta sauce. Remember: Pasta for breakfast is a great choice, especially when it’s loaded with healthful pea protein.

Ingredients

Kosher salt
1 pound fresh English peas in pods (yields about 1 cup shelled peas and about 3 ½ cups pods)
½ cup water
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 small spring onions or 2 large shallots, chopped
2 small spring garlic (whites) or 3 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons Greek yogurt (optional)
12 ounces whole grain pasta, such as linguine, rigatoni or small shells
Freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup fresh mint (peppermint preferred), thinly sliced
Espelette pepper to taste (optional)
Grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese (optional)

Directions

  1. Bring a large pot of water to boil and add enough salt to make it salty like the sea.
  2. Meanwhile, wash the peas. Pull off the stem ends: remove the peas and place in a small bowl. Reserve the pods.
  3. Fill a bowl with cold water. Set aside. Add the empty pea pods to the pot of boiling water and cook for 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon or spider, remove the pods from the boiling water and transfer to the bowl of cold water to cool quickly. Drain the pea pods and add to a Vitamix or high-speed blender. Add ½ cup water. Puree for 2 to 3 minutes.
  4. Place a fine strainer over a bowl and add the pea pod puree to the strainer, pressing on the solids to release as much puree as possible into the bowl. Discard the solids in the strainer. Reserve the puree in the bowl; season to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. Cook the pasta in the pot of boiling water until al dente, stirring occasionally.
  6. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and sauté until softened, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the peas and cook 2 minutes. Stir in the reserved pea pod puree and Greek yogurt, if using, and cook just until heated through. (Don’t overcook the peas or puree as the sauce will turn brown).
  7. Using tongs or a spider, transfer the pasta to the sauce in the skillet. Toss until combined. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer the pasta to the serving bowl. Add the basil and mint. Serve with Espelette pepper and grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, if using.

Nutritional info (per serving)

Makes 4 servings.

Calories: 554 kcal
Total fiber: 12 g
Soluble fiber: 0.1 g
Protein: 15.5 g
Total fat: 16.7 g
Saturated fat: 2.0 g
Healthy fats: 12.1 g
Carbohydrates: 84 g
Sugars: 7.7 g
Added sugars: 0 g
Sodium: 178 mg
Potassium: 433 mg
Magnesium: 14 mg
Calcium: 134 mg

Source: The What to Eat When Cookbook by Michael F. Roizen, MD, Michael Crupain, MD, MPH and Jim Perko, Sr, CEC, AAC.

Recipe: Stuffed Tomatoes With Poblano and Avocado






Cleveland Clinic

@ClevelandClinic
·


Especially good with summer’s freshest tomatoes, this delicious, easy and satisfying snack will hit the spot:

There’s nothing better than inviting friends over to enjoy a walk or bike ride, followed by a snack featuring vegetables from your garden. But it doesn’t have to be summer and you don’t need a garden to enjoy this recipe. All you need is an appreciation for delicious, easy and satisfying whole foods!

Ingredients

8 Campari tomatoes
2 Poblano peppers
1 avocado, pitted and peeled
½ bunch cilantro, including stems
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 ½ teaspoons fresh lime juice
½ teaspoon sea salt
2 tablespoons toasted sunflower seeds

Directions

  1. Rest the peppers on the grate of a gas stove. Turn the fire on medium and char the peppers, turning them with tongs, until evenly blackened and blistered, about 5 minutes.(Alternatively, you can roast the peppers over a gas grill or under the broiler.)
  2. Transfer the peppers to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let steam. When cool enough to handle, rub off the charred skin and discard, along with the stems and seeds.
  3. While the peppers cool, slice off a little from the top and bottom of each tomato to create flat surfaces. Cut the tomatoes in half. Scoop out the seeds and discard.
  4. Transfer the peppers to a food processor, along with the avocado, cilantro, lime juice and salt. Puree until very smooth.
  5. Transfer the puree to a zipper-top plastic bag and snip a hole in one corner. Pipe the avocado mixture into the tomato halves. Top with the sunflower seeds and serve.

Nutrition information

Makes 4 servings

Per serving (2 stuffed tomatoes):
Calories 140
Fat 9g
Saturated fat 1.5g
Cholesterol 0mg
Fiber 4g
Protein 2g
Carbohydrates 12g
Sodium 300mg

Recipe from Mark Hyman, MD

Recipe: Grilled Halibut and Asparagus With Herb Sauce

A heart-healthy accompaniment that works for flounder and ocean trout, too

In this dish, we grill hearty, delicious halibut along with tender asparagus. The bright, zesty sauce combines fresh parsley and cilantro with shallot, lemon and red pepper. Though this dish is loaded with beneficial plant nutrients and nourishing fats and protein, the flavors are what your guests and family will love.

Ingredients

3 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 a shallot, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon grated lemon zest
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 teaspoon + 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1 pound asparagus, ends trimmed
4 4-ounce pieces halibut, flounder or fluke fillet, about 3/4 inch thick

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, stir together the parsley, cilantro, oregano, shallot, lemon zest, lemon juice, 2 tablespoons of the oil, 1/8 teaspoon of the salt, the black pepper and the red pepper flakes.
  2. Heat the grill to medium-high.
  3. Drizzle 2 teaspoons of the oil over the asparagus, and sprinkle with 1/8 teaspoon of the salt and the remaining 1/8 teaspoon black pepper. Toss well.
  4. Rub the fish with the remaining 1 teaspoon oil. Sprinkle with the remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt.
  5. Grill the asparagus for about 3 minutes, or until tender and charred. Grill the fish for 2 to 3 minutes per side, or until opaque throughout.
  6. Serve the fish with the asparagus, and spoon some herb sauce over the top.

Nutrition information (per serving):

Makes 4 servings 

Calories: 255
Total fat: 13 g
Saturated fat: 2 g
Protein: 27 g
Carbohydrate: 12 g
Dietary fiber: 3 g
Sugar: 3 g
Added sugar: 0 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 170 mg

Recipe developed by Sara Quessenberry for Cleveland Clinic Wellness.

This fresh English Pea Pasta recipe is loaded with healthful pea protein @ClevelandClinic

There is something special about using fresh peas straight out of the pod. This recipe was inspired by our root-to-stem philosophy of cooking: It always seems like such a waste to throw away the pea pods, but they are relatively inedible. To make use of the pods, we’ve pureed them into a spring-fresh pasta sauce. Remember: Pasta for breakfast is a great choice, especially when it’s loaded with healthful pea protein.

Ingredients

Kosher salt
1 pound fresh English peas in pods (yields about 1 cup shelled peas and about 3 ½ cups pods)
½ cup water
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 small spring onions or 2 large shallots, chopped
2 small spring garlic (whites) or 3 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons Greek yogurt (optional)
12 ounces whole grain pasta, such as linguine, rigatoni or small shells
Freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup fresh mint (peppermint preferred), thinly sliced
Espelette pepper to taste (optional)
Grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese (optional)

Directions

  1. Bring a large pot of water to boil and add enough salt to make it salty like the sea.
  2. Meanwhile, wash the peas. Pull off the stem ends: remove the peas and place in a small bowl. Reserve the pods.
  3. Fill a bowl with cold water. Set aside. Add the empty pea pods to the pot of boiling water and cook for 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon or spider, remove the pods from the boiling water and transfer to the bowl of cold water to cool quickly. Drain the pea pods and add to a Vitamix or high-speed blender. Add ½ cup water. Puree for 2 to 3 minutes.
  4. Place a fine strainer over a bowl and add the pea pod puree to the strainer, pressing on the solids to release as much puree as possible into the bowl. Discard the solids in the strainer. Reserve the puree in the bowl; season to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. Cook the pasta in the pot of boiling water until al dente, stirring occasionally.
  6. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and sauté until softened, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the peas and cook 2 minutes. Stir in the reserved pea pod puree and Greek yogurt, if using, and cook just until heated through. (Don’t overcook the peas or puree as the sauce will turn brown).
  7. Using tongs or a spider, transfer the pasta to the sauce in the skillet. Toss until combined. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer the pasta to the serving bowl. Add the basil and mint. Serve with Espelette pepper and grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, if using.

Nutritional info (per serving)

Makes 4 servings.

Calories: 554 kcal
Total fiber: 12 g
Soluble fiber: 0.1 g
Protein: 15.5 g
Total fat: 16.7 g
Saturated fat: 2.0 g
Healthy fats: 12.1 g
Carbohydrates: 84 g
Sugars: 7.7 g
Added sugars: 0 g
Sodium: 178 mg
Potassium: 433 mg
Magnesium: 14 mg
Calcium: 134 mg

Source: The What to Eat When Cookbook by Michael F. Roizen, MD, Michael Crupain, MD, MPH and Jim Perko, Sr, CEC, AAC.

How to Fix a Healthy, No-Fuss Buddha Bowl

Know what a Buddha bowl is and what goes in it? Dietitian Anna Taylor, MS, RD, LD, CDCES, explains this simple concept that’s known by many aliases — bliss, glory or nourish bowl — just to name a few.
Why all the bliss and glory?
Because the recipe for buddha bowls couldn’t be easier. Plus they bring everything together that could ever make your belly happy.
You just cook each option separately (if needed) and leave them to chill in the fridge for a bit. Then layer up your ingredients for a super-quick meal that really packs in the nutrients you need each day. 
“With the right ingredients, you can’t go wrong,” Taylor says. “Buddha bowls are always good — and good for you, too.”
Build your base
Your entire bowl should start with about 1 cup of cooked grains. Regardless of what you put in, overall you’ll want your ingredients ratio in these recipes to be about 25% grains, 50% vegetables, 20% lean protein and 5% herbs, spices and toppings.
Go for the grains
Start by cooking up some healthy grains and letting them chill. Some really good-for- you grains to consider in your buddha bowl base are:
Udon noodles.
Quinoa.
Brown rice.
Veg out
You can get a great big portion of your recommended daily veggie requirements in with one of these bowls, so don’t be shy and really go all out with this part! Just sauté them in olive oil — or add them raw at the end. Consider these fresh, cooked and cooled healthy options to really embolden your buddha bowl.
Broccoli.
Carrots.
Arugula.
Beets.
Spinach.
Cauliflower.
Pack in the protein
Your buddha bowls can be vegetarian or contain meat or seafood, and it’s up to you. Foods like tofu, fish, beans, plant proteins and lean white meat add plenty of nutritional benefits to your buddha bowl. Consider these, using about ½ cup: 
Tofu.
Shrimp.
Edamame.
Chickpeas.
Leftover roasted chicken.
Kidney beans.
Tuna.
Don’t forget good fats
The fresher and nuttier, the better with all of these foods that give you a burst of healthy fats. Use between 2 and 4 tablespoons of any of these :
Avocado.
Sesame seeds.
Cashew nuts.
Pumpkin seeds.
Tahini.
Spice it up
Here’s where it gets fun and really, anything goes. Brighten up your bowl with zesty spices, fresh herbs and fun flavors:
Cilantro.
Fresh chopped ginger.
Minced garlic.
Chili flakes.
Fresh or dried basil.
Scallions.
Get a little saucy
Top it off by drizzling some super-charged flavor over the top with these homemade healthy sauces:
Pureed cilantro with a squeeze of lime and olive oil.
Peanut butter and squeeze of lime.
Basil pesto with pine nuts and olive oil.
Lemon squeeze.
Taylor emphasizes, “If you follow this guide, no matter what buddha bowl you create you’re sure to make your belly happy and your whole body healthy. And you’ll be fueled up for the rest of your day.”

How to Fix a Healthy, No-Fuss Buddha Bowl

Know what a Buddha bowl is and what goes in it? Dietitian Anna Taylor, MS, RD, LD, CDCES, explains this simple concept that’s known by many aliases — bliss, glory or nourish bowl — just to name a few.
Why all the bliss and glory?
Because the recipe for buddha bowls couldn’t be easier. Plus they bring everything together that could ever make your belly happy.
You just cook each option separately (if needed) and leave them to chill in the fridge for a bit. Then layer up your ingredients for a super-quick meal that really packs in the nutrients you need each day. 
“With the right ingredients, you can’t go wrong,” Taylor says. “Buddha bowls are always good — and good for you, too.”
Build your base
Your entire bowl should start with about 1 cup of cooked grains. Regardless of what you put in, overall you’ll want your ingredients ratio in these recipes to be about 25% grains, 50% vegetables, 20% lean protein and 5% herbs, spices and toppings.
Go for the grains
Start by cooking up some healthy grains and letting them chill. Some really good-for- you grains to consider in your buddha bowl base are:
Udon noodles.
Quinoa.
Brown rice.
Veg out
You can get a great big portion of your recommended daily veggie requirements in with one of these bowls, so don’t be shy and really go all out with this part! Just sauté them in olive oil — or add them raw at the end. Consider these fresh, cooked and cooled healthy options to really embolden your buddha bowl.
Broccoli.
Carrots.
Arugula.
Beets.
Spinach.
Cauliflower.
Pack in the protein
Your buddha bowls can be vegetarian or contain meat or seafood, and it’s up to you. Foods like tofu, fish, beans, plant proteins and lean white meat add plenty of nutritional benefits to your buddha bowl. Consider these, using about ½ cup: 
Tofu.
Shrimp.
Edamame.
Chickpeas.
Leftover roasted chicken.
Kidney beans.
Tuna.
Don’t forget good fats
The fresher and nuttier, the better with all of these foods that give you a burst of healthy fats. Use between 2 and 4 tablespoons of any of these :
Avocado.
Sesame seeds.
Cashew nuts.
Pumpkin seeds.
Tahini.
Spice it up
Here’s where it gets fun and really, anything goes. Brighten up your bowl with zesty spices, fresh herbs and fun flavors:
Cilantro.
Fresh chopped ginger.
Minced garlic.
Chili flakes.
Fresh or dried basil.
Scallions.
Get a little saucy
Top it off by drizzling some super-charged flavor over the top with these homemade healthy sauces:
Pureed cilantro with a squeeze of lime and olive oil.
Peanut butter and squeeze of lime.
Basil pesto with pine nuts and olive oil.
Lemon squeeze.
Taylor emphasizes, “If you follow this guide, no matter what buddha bowl you create you’re sure to make your belly happy and your whole body healthy. And you’ll be fueled up for the rest of your day.”

Recipe: Asparagus, tomato and red pepper French bread pizza

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Are you craving the taste of a pizza but not the guilt and all the calories? Consider trying this healthy remake of French bread pizza that could turn into your new favorite Friday night treat. It’s easy, delicious and approx. 265 calories per slice.

Dietitian’s note: For a crispier pizza, bake on a pizza stone — a heavy, round plate that simulates the brick bottoms of some commercial pizza ovens. For best results, put the pizza stone on the lowest oven shelf.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup diced asparagus
  • 1 cup diced Roma tomatoes
  • 1 cup diced red bell pepper
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 loaf French bread, about 8 inches long, sliced in half and cut into 4-inch sections
  • 1 cup pizza sauce
  • 1 cup reduced-fat shredded mozzarella cheese

Directions:

Heat the oven to 400 F. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

In a small bowl, add the asparagus, tomatoes and pepper. Add the garlic and toss gently to coat evenly. Arrange the French bread on the baking sheet. Add 1/4 cup of the pizza sauce and 1/4 of the vegetable mixture to each section. Sprinkle each with 1/4 cup mozzarella cheese.

Bake until the cheese is lightly browned and the vegetables are tender, about 8 to 10 minutes. Serve immediately.

Serving size: 1 4-inch section

Calories 265
Total fat 5 g
Saturated fat 2 g
Trans fat 0 g
Monounsaturated fat 0.5 g
Cholesterol 12 mg
Sodium 660 mg
Total carbohydrate 40 g
Dietary fiber 4 g
Added sugars 0 g
Protein 15 g
Nutritional analysis per serving

This recipe and many others can be found on Mayo Clinic’s website.

This fresh English Pea Pasta recipe is loaded with healthful pea protein @ClevelandClinic

There is something special about using fresh peas straight out of the pod. This recipe was inspired by our root-to-stem philosophy of cooking: It always seems like such a waste to throw away the pea pods, but they are relatively inedible. To make use of the pods, we’ve pureed them into a spring-fresh pasta sauce. Remember: Pasta for breakfast is a great choice, especially when it’s loaded with healthful pea protein.

Ingredients

Kosher salt
1 pound fresh English peas in pods (yields about 1 cup shelled peas and about 3 ½ cups pods)
½ cup water
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 small spring onions or 2 large shallots, chopped
2 small spring garlic (whites) or 3 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons Greek yogurt (optional)
12 ounces whole grain pasta, such as linguine, rigatoni or small shells
Freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup fresh mint (peppermint preferred), thinly sliced
Espelette pepper to taste (optional)
Grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese (optional)

Directions

  1. Bring a large pot of water to boil and add enough salt to make it salty like the sea.
  2. Meanwhile, wash the peas. Pull off the stem ends: remove the peas and place in a small bowl. Reserve the pods.
  3. Fill a bowl with cold water. Set aside. Add the empty pea pods to the pot of boiling water and cook for 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon or spider, remove the pods from the boiling water and transfer to the bowl of cold water to cool quickly. Drain the pea pods and add to a Vitamix or high-speed blender. Add ½ cup water. Puree for 2 to 3 minutes.
  4. Place a fine strainer over a bowl and add the pea pod puree to the strainer, pressing on the solids to release as much puree as possible into the bowl. Discard the solids in the strainer. Reserve the puree in the bowl; season to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. Cook the pasta in the pot of boiling water until al dente, stirring occasionally.
  6. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and sauté until softened, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the peas and cook 2 minutes. Stir in the reserved pea pod puree and Greek yogurt, if using, and cook just until heated through. (Don’t overcook the peas or puree as the sauce will turn brown).
  7. Using tongs or a spider, transfer the pasta to the sauce in the skillet. Toss until combined. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer the pasta to the serving bowl. Add the basil and mint. Serve with Espelette pepper and grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, if using.

Nutritional info (per serving)

Makes 4 servings.

Calories: 554 kcal
Total fiber: 12 g
Soluble fiber: 0.1 g
Protein: 15.5 g
Total fat: 16.7 g
Saturated fat: 2.0 g
Healthy fats: 12.1 g
Carbohydrates: 84 g
Sugars: 7.7 g
Added sugars: 0 g
Sodium: 178 mg
Potassium: 433 mg
Magnesium: 14 mg
Calcium: 134 mg

Source: The What to Eat When Cookbook by Michael F. Roizen, MD, Michael Crupain, MD, MPH and Jim Perko, Sr, CEC, AAC.