Wine the big bummer-alcohol not part of a healthy diet

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5 Ways to Boost Your Immune System..

Making time for regular exercise (even during the busiest times of the year) helps keep the immune system running the way it should.

Your immune system likely needs a holiday boost, and you are the only one who can do it. (Things like stress, foods high in saturated fat, alcohol, and skipping exercise can all weaken this key part of the body that helps fight off infection and keep you healthy.) Put yourself at the top of your holiday checklist and give yourself this gift of health.

First, take this oath:

  • I will avoid colds and flu;
  • I will sleep at least 7.5 hours a night, and preferably eight;
  • I will eat well (meaning more vegetables and fruits and fewer processed foods)
  • I will set aside a sacred 20 minutes for exercise every day;
  • I will seek out positive social interactions.

So help me, health.

You’ve heard every one of the bullets points above, probably multiple times, and you may be anesthetized to them. But here is why actually committing to those resolutions is so important.

Our immune systems are the basis of our health, which of course plays a big role when it comes to our overall wellness and happiness. The immune system’s complex network of organs, cells, and molecules pro­tects us from anything foreign and potentially harmful, such as viruses, bacteria, cancer cells, toxic chemicals, and more. Through a process called the immune response, this system attacks invading organisms and substances as they enter the body and work to inflict disease. Especially important are the white blood cells produced and stored in the spleen, bone marrow, and other sites. They circulate through the body and spring into action to destroy potentially harmful foreign invaders — and then remember those invaders so they can guard against them in the future.

So it seems especially important to make sure your immune system is in top condition, as cold- and flu-season ramps up and the holidays put extra stress on our bodies (thanks to the social events, to-do lists, and potentially not-so-healthy indulgences that can come with the festivities). Paying a little extra attention can help keep you well now. And in the long run, you’ll begin a regimen that will help guard against chronic problems like diabetes, obesity, heart disease and hypertension, and even cancer.

Here’s how to keep your immune system running smoothly over the holidays — and all year long!

https://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/white-seeber-grogan-the-remedy-chicks/enhancing-your-immune-system-this-holiday/?xid=t

 

No Amount of Alcohol Is Safe,

everyday health wine

Everyday Health
@EverydayHealth

Is it healthy to drink a glass of wine every day?

No Amount of Alcohol Is Safe, a Global Analysis of Research Suggests

The large-scale research puts a hole in the idea that one glass of wine a day is safe.

Prior research suggests moderate drinking may offer health benefits like reduced stress and a healthier heart.
iStock

Having that wind-down glass of wine when you get home from work may be harming your health. That’s because, according to a large-scale, global meta-analysis of research published August 23, 2018 in The Lancet, there’s a chance that no amount of alcohol is safe.

For the review, researchers pulled from 694 data sources, profiling who and how much those in a global population were drinking, and from 592 studies looking at the relationship between alcohol and disease. They found that 2.8 million deaths were attributed to alcohol use in 2016.

If you drink alcohol, you probably want to take a moment now to mention that previous studies have shown imbibing in moderation is good for your heart. The French live long, healthy lives because of wine! you say. Guess what: the new Lancet study found that drinking alcohol was minimally helpful for stroke, heart disease, and diabetes, but when taken in the context of other causes of death — such as cancer and car accidents — the risks outweighed the small potential benefit.

RELATED: This Is Your Heart on Alcohol