Fuel up with protein and healthy fats for breakfast!

cleveland keto breakfast

Cleveland Clinic
@ClevelandClinic

Fuel up with protein and healthy fats for breakfast!

A meal that’s heavy in sugar and starch is no way to start your day – especially if you’re following the ketogenic diet.

These recipes from functional medicine specialist Mark Hyman, MD, are a great way for anyone — keto or not — to bring real, whole, fresh foods (including non-starchy vegetables) to your plate first thing in the morning.

Jicama Hash with Turkey Bacon and Avocado

The jicama serves as a lighter alternative to traditional potato, while turkey bacon is a stand-in for pork.

Scrambled Eggs With Tomatoes, Herbs and Goat Cheese

This versatile, protein-packed meal is easy on your digestive system and always a hit with the kids, too.

Ginger Spice Smoothie

A creamy, low-carb smoothie is a great way to start your day and get into fat-burning mode. And ginger is great for digestions.

Sauteed Veggies With Avocado & Poached Egg

What’s the easiest way to upgrade a plate of greens? Put an egg on top! This tasty and comforting dish is good for breakfast – or lunch or dinner.

Non-Coffee Vanilla Latte

For those who don’t want coffee, this latte is a great morning drink that provides healthy fat without caffeine.

Broccoli Sausage Frittata

With a few veggies and precooked sausage, you can have this satisfying, savory frittata on the table in under 45 minutes.

Keto Breakfast Ideas: 6 Ways to Start the Day Without a Lot of Carbs

Recipe: Perfect Chocolate Chia Pudding Sweet mix of coconut, cherries and chocolate

A top-down view of a chocolate smoothie bowl (thick smoothie served in a bowl with a spoon) garnished with chia seeds, large coconut flakes and cacao nibs. Healthy vegan breakfast. The smoothie portion contains banana, chocolate, almond milk and ice.

This pudding is packed with health-promoting chia seeds, almond milk, cinnamon, cocoa, coconut flakes and dried fruit. It’s the perfect chocolate treat.

Ingredients

½ cup Chia seeds
1 cup vanilla almond milk, unsweetened
1 cup 2% milk (may use all almond for non-dairy option)
1½ tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon cocoa powder, unsweetened
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 tablespoons coconut flakes, unsweetened
2 tablespoons dried tart cherries, or other unsweetened dried fruit

Directions

  1. Place chia seeds, milks, honey, cocoa, cinnamon and vanilla in a glass container with a tight lid.
  2. Seal and shake well to combine. Refrigerate for at least 5 hours or overnight.
  3. Serve topped with coconut flakes and dried fruit to garnish.

Note: For a smoother texture, blend pudding in a high power blender before refrigerating. Be sure to blend well to avoid a gritty texture.

Nutrition information

Makes 6 servings

Each 1/2 cup serving contains:

Calories 140
Total fat 7g
Saturated fat 2g
Trans fat 0g
Protein 4g
Total carbohydrate 16g
Fiber 6g
Sugar 7g
Cholesterol 5mg
Sodium 150mg

https://health.clevelandclinic.org/2017/09/recipe-perfect-chocolate-chia-pudding/

3 common solutions for back pain with physical therapy:@ClevelandClinic

Cleveland Clinic
@ClevelandClinic

3 common solutions for back pain with physical therapy:

Recipe: Nutty Steel Cut Oats With Fruit

Cleveland Clinic
@ClevelandClinic

Upgrade your breakfast with steel cut oats. They’re freshly milled from high protein oats make a delightful, full-bodied hot cereal:

Ingredients

¼ cup steel cut oatmeal
¾ cup unsweetened almond milk
1 tablespoon fresh strawberries
1 tablespoon fresh blueberries
1 teaspoon toasted walnuts, chopped
½ teaspoon honey

Preparation

  1. In a medium-sized pot, add almond milk and oatmeal.
  2. Bring to simmer; stir until oatmeal is thick and creamy – about 20 minutes.
  3. Serve with your favorite fresh berries, sliced bananas, or toasted walnuts, and almond milk.

Nutritional information (Per serving)

Makes 1 serving
Calories: 210
Total fat: 6 g
Saturated fat: .5 g
Protein: 7 g
Carbohydrate: 34 g
Dietary fiber: 5 g
Sugar: 4 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg

Source: Chef Michelle Bartoul-Mangan, Cleveland Clinic Wellness

3 Reasons Why You Need Vinyasa Yoga

Eddie Modestini teaching a vinyasa yoga class

 

Eddie Modestini, who will lead Yoga Journal’s upcoming online course, Vinyasa 101: The Fundamentals of Flow, explains how vinyasa yoga benefits your body, mind, and spirit.

You know you love your flow class, but did you ever think about WHY it feels so good? Below, Eddie Modestini, a longtime student of K. Pattabhi Jois and B.K.S. Iyengar who will lead Yoga Journal’s upcoming online course, Vinyasa 101: The Fundamentals of Flow, explains how vinyasa yoga benefits your body, mind, and spirit. (Sign up for this essential guide to vinyasa yoga HERE.)

1. Vinyasa yoga addresses the stiff culture we live in.

The Western world has become a seated society, which is why vinyasa yoga is so important: its orientation is breath and movement, and research shows that increased movement in a seated society is absolutely essential for health. Vinyasa yoga gets us moving.

2. Vinyasa yoga trains the mind.

With a seated society comes a toxic mind: because our bodies are still, our minds are racing. Vinyasa yoga stills the mind because it has so many focal points that train the mind: the breath, movements, bandhas, postures, and sequences. We’re really focusing on the breath at first, and then, as the mind gains the ability to concentrate, we are able to focus on many things at once. Step by step we expand the mind with the practice. Without proper training, the mind jumps all over the place, distracting us from working on the parts of our beings that will actually help us evolve. Vinyasa yoga stills the mind, giving it the ability to process what the practice brings up to the surface — the joyful stuff and sometimes the uncomfortable stuff as well.

3. Vinyasa yoga teaches us how to care for ourselves.

Vinyasa yoga teaches us how to be loving toward ourselves. How to be compassionate to ourselves, because human beings have self-defeating and self-limiting tendencies. We are our own worst critics. Practicing vinaysa yoga brings the content of our beings to the surface so we can see it. Inside the muscles, we hold the memories of every emotion we’ve ever experienced: sadness, fear, anger, etc. Through the asanas, we can tap into these memories and process our pasts. It’s the asanas that release the emotions out of the body. Being a yogi really means engaging in the process of healing: mentally, emotionally, and physically. Vinyasa yoga helps us learn how to accept all the parts of ourselves that aren’t as evolved as we might like them to be.

Eddie Modestini is the co-director and co-owner of Maya Yoga Studio in Maui. Sign up here for Modestini’s upcoming Vinyasa 101 course, which will cover the anatomy of the spine, how to adapt asana for various body types, and much more.

Recipe: Savory Sweet Potato-Quinoa Muffins

Cleveland Clinic
@ClevelandClinic

These deliciously cozy muffins satisfy cravings both sweet and savory, and offer impressive health benefits (fiber, beta-carotene and vitamins galore), all at once:

Think of these deliciously cozy muffins as a triple treat: They manage to soothe the soul, satisfy cravings both sweet and savory, and offer impressive health benefits (fiber, beta-carotene and vitamins galore), all at once. You may want to double the recipe — we guarantee they won’t last long.

Ingredients

¾ cup quinoa flour
½ cup almond meal/flour
1½ teaspoons baking soda
½ teaspoon kosher salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 large eggs
1½ cups sweet potato puree
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
¾ cup water
1½ cups quinoa, cooked
½ cup walnuts, chopped
¼ cup flat leaf parsley, chopped
2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
2 scallions, chopped

Directions

  1. Heat the oven to 350°F. Line a 12-cup muffin pan with paper liners.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the quinoa flour, almond meal, baking soda, salt and pepper (the dry ingredients).
  3. In a large bowl, beat the eggs. Whisk in the sweet potato puree, olive oil and water. Add the dry ingredients from the first bowl, above, and whisk together. Stir in the cooked quinoa, walnuts, parsley, thyme and scallions.
  4. Divide the batter evenly among the cups. Bake 30 to 35 minutes, until just a few moist crumbs remain on a toothpick inserted into the middle of one muffin. Serve warm.

Nutritional information (per serving)

Makes 12 muffins (1 serving = 1 muffin)

140 calories, 6.5 g total fat, 1 g saturated fat, 5 g protein, 16 g carbohydrate, 2.3 g dietary fiber, 1.8 g sugar, 32 mg cholesterol, 280 mg sodium

Developed by Sara Quessenberry for Cleveland Clinic Wellness

Why Do You Always Wake Up at 3 a.m.?

cleveland waking up at night

Cleveland Clinic
@ClevelandClinic

Waking up at night, by itself, isn’t a problem. However, waking up and staying awake can be. Here’s what to do:
Why Do You Always Wake Up at 3 a.m.?
It’s a common phenomenon — and usually harmless
health.clevelandclinic.org